And I Still See Their Faces
Men

 

  361 Herman (Hersz) Abranowicz, born in 1856, an agricultural engineer. He owned an estate near Krosno. Then he and his family moved to Vienna, where he became an insurance agent, offering his services to Polish landowners. Summers, he would bring his family to Brzuchowice near Lvov. In 1927, he died of a hemorrhage in a cafe opposite his home, where he had gone to read the paper, as usual.


362
Motel Rottenberg, the only son of Chaim Rottenberg from Skryhiczyn. Before World War I. "In the village, my uncle was nicknamed the cashier because he paid wages to people who were employed for work in the fields, in the forest, and for construction work. We liked him because he was joyful and good-hearted." Ita Kowalska, Warsaw

363
Henryk Filozof, employee at the Lilpopp factory in Warsaw. Born 1870, died 1909.

364
Ignacy Weisstein, Jaroslaw, before World War I.

365
Chaim Rottenberg, the owner of the Skryhiczyn estate, father of eight daughters and one son. He died in 1927 at age 70. "Grandma Lea considered Grandpa to be a peasant and treated him a little contemptously. She didn't conceal her discontent with his poor knowledge of subjects beyond biblical-traditional matters." Ita Kowalska, Warsaw

366
Dr. Ludwig Israel Laszky. Interwar period.

367
From the family archives of Dr. Jzef Leider of Krakw. Jaroslaw, between the wars.
368 Dr. Laszky, reflected portrait.

369
Abraham Prywes, Ita's father. "From our father, we have only his engineer's diploma and a beautiful night gown. He died just after finishing his studies in Zurich in 1916. He wasn't even 30 then." Ita Kowalska, Warsaw

370
Bremer, first name unknown. Goleszw, just after World War I.

371
On reverse side: "Breit." From the town of Baranw Sandomierski. Photograph taken by Michal Dabrowski.

372
From the Tendler family album, from Skala (near Ojcw).

373
From the Tendler family album, from Skala (near Ojcw).

374
On the back, a circular Stamp which reads, "J. Sobiborec, Medical Surgeon," 1936. "He was a surgeon in Drohiczyn, and a friend of my parents. Ewa Posnik, Warsaw

375
From the Tendler fami1y albm, from Skala (near Oicw). Photograph taken in Sosnowiec.

376
Name unknown. From the town of Baranw Sandomierski. Photograph taken by Michal Dabrowski.

377
Name unknown. Print made from a glass plate found in Zdufiska Wola.

378
Name unknown.

379
Samuel Blumsztajn. In Radomsko he had a store with sanitary equipment, chamber pots, and the like. He perished in Treblinka, along with five of his seven children.

380
Karfunkel. From the Abranowicz family archives. Probably a clerk who worked in Tarnopol. Photograph from before World War I.

381
Bemo Schwarz, the husband of Karolina of the Abranowicz family. "We called him Bennikl. He was a judge somewhere in the Balkans, probably in Bosnia and Herzegovina." (From the notes of Vicky Abrams)

382
Julius Wagner, a dentist from Olawa near Wroclaw, son of Erna from the Abranowicz family.

383
From the Tendler family album, from Skala (near Ojcw).

384
Rabbi Joel Fuks. Plock, from before World War I.

385
Zygmund Rundo, a grandson of Samuel Orgelbrand. He was the owner of a printing-house in Warsaw. His father, Dawid, wrote books that were supposed to bring Jewish culture closer to Poles. He himself was a supporter of total assimilation. To protect his granddaughters from discrimination, he converted to Catholicism. He died in February 1939, at 75.

386
Jerzy Rundo, son of Zygmunt. Photograph from World War I, when he was studying at the Zurich Polytechnic. He died in 1929 at the age of 34. His daughters, grandchildren, and great - grandchildren live in Warsaw.

387
Name unknown. Warsaw Ghetto, 1942. "At that time I was a student in the state photography school, situated not far from the Ghetto. At the very beginning, when the Ghetto was not yet cut off from the rest of the world, my friends and I would walk through and take pictures." Wojciech Stablewski, Warsaw

388
Samuel Moses Landau from Plock, son of Lea and Jakob Landau. He died in 1913 at the age of 69. His great-granddaughter lives in Warsaw.

389
Print from a glass plate found in Zdunska Wola.

390
Dr. Szymon Brysz, rabbi, in liturgical robes. He died in 1922.

391
Marcel Lensztajn, son of one of the directors of the Poznanski factory in Ldz.

392
Edmund Winawer, called up to service as an officer of the Russian army at the time of the Russo-Japanese War, 1905. The grandfather of Irena Winawer of Warsaw.

393
Jakob Szlifersztein. Warsaw, 1928. Active member of the Polish Socialist Party. In 1944, as the Soviet Army was entering Lublin, he attempted to pull a man out of an oncoming tank and was himself killed by the tank. He was the second husband of the maternal grandmother of Irena Winawer.

394
Wiadyslaw Urwicz, engineer. Photograph found after the war in the debris of a staircase, where it had been hidden with some documents.

395
Name unknown. He had an orchard in the area of Lvov. 1937.

396
Feliks Fiszel, Tashkent, USSR, 1945.

397
"This was a friend of Adam Garmulewicz, my father. They served together in the non-commissioned officers' school of the Fifth Heavy Artillery Regiment in Krakw. During the occupation my mother hid the photo and after the War glued it back into the album." Wanda Niezgodzinska, Katowice

398
Michal, last name unknown. He attended the gymnasium in Otwock. Sheltered by his schoolmates, he probably survived the War and emigrated to England.

399
Herman Abranowicz. First picture was taken in Lvov in 1912, the second one is taped to a viennese tram ticked valid in June 1926.

400
"Szmul and Menasze Tencer, sons of Chaim Lejb and Golda (ne Ajzenberg), the only members of an extended family, who managed to survive the Warsaw Ghetto uprising, Majdanek, Auschwitz and Mauthausen. After the War, fate separated them. Szmul remained in Udi, Menasze emigrated to Brazil. We who loved them still recall their warm family homes." Their children: Golda of Warsaw, Golda of Tel Aviv, Jankiel of Lund (Sweden), Lejb and Abram of Sao Paulo (Brazil)

401
"Szmul and Menasze Tencer, sons of Chaim Lejb and Golda (ne Ajzenberg), the only members of an extended family, who managed to survive the Warsaw Ghetto uprising, Majdanek, Auschwitz and Mauthausen. After the War, fate separated them. Szmul remained in Udi, Menasze emigrated to Brazil. We who loved them still recall their warm family homes." Their children: Golda of Warsaw, Golda of Tel Aviv, Jankiel of Lund (Sweden), Lejb and Abram of Sao Paulo (Brazil)

402
An identity card from 1923. Icyk Rubinowicz, born January 14, 1895 in Lodz, son of Aron and Blima. Religion: Judaism. Occupation: baker. Marital status: married.

403
Herman Abranowicz. First picture was taken in Lvov in 1912, the second one is taped to a viennese tram ticked valid in June 1926.

404
Watchmaker Klajnman from Kupiecka Street in Otwock. Summer 1942. Not long thereafter he was sent to Treblinka.

405
Jerzy Filozof (1896-1974), the eldest son of Maria and Henryk Filozof. In 1913 he emigrated to France. He was the general engineer at a potassium mine in Alsace.

406
Dr. Samuel Abusz from Radomsko. He had an obstetrics clinic and served in the Pilsudski Legion. This much can be gleaned from the documents found in the 1980s in the apartment which belonged to the Abusz family until 1942.

407
Jzef Seweryn as a business school student, Krakow, 1930s.

408
Josif Edelsztein of Warsaw. Photograph taken in the Udmurt Autonomous Republic of the Soviet Union in 1944.

409
Dawid Krakowiak, head of administration at the quarry in Wapienna, in the area of Inowroclaw, 1930s. He was arrested right after the Germans arrived; later that same year the Gestapo also took away his wife and children (who were nicknamed Manzi and Bubi). Nothing more was ever heard of them.

410
List of tailors in the ghetto in Wloclawek. Excerpt of a list of residents, arranged according to occupation, probably prepared at the order of the German administration. On the list are the names of confectioners, hairdressers, bakers, saddlers, shopkeepers, etc., in alphabetical order.

411
Print from a glass plate, made by a photographer who used to ride by wagon from village to village around Dobromil in Galicia (now in Ukraine).

412
Name unknown.

413
Izaak Gruber's schoolmates from the gymnasium. Zloczw, near Lvov, 1935.

414
Izaak Gruber's schoolmates from the gymnasium. Zloczw, near Lvov, 1935.

415
Izaak Gruber's schoolmates from the gymnasium. Zloczw, near Lvov, 1935.

416
Name unknown. Przemysl, around 1936.


417 "He was my cousin. He lived in America. This is a photograph from his Bar Mitzvah in the 1930s. My grandmother, Bluma Rubinowicz, sent it to me, because she wanted me to marry him. But I said that I wasn't going to jump into a completely unknown situation like that. And so I stayed in Poland." Sonia Tencer, Warszawa.


418
On the reverse: "Mr. Ring from Nowy Sacz, a Jew who was decorated with the Virtuti Militari by Jzef Pilsudski for heroism shown on the front at Kiev in 1920. He also had many austrian decorations. Chairman of the Association of Jewish Combatants in Nowy Sacz."

419
Beniamin Niedzwiedz. As a volunteer in the Polish -Bolshevik War, he travelled to Kolomyya, from whence he sent his photograph on June 15, 1920. His parents had a drugstore on Bielanska Street in Warsaw. Before World War II he emigrated to Brazil. He died in the 1980s.

420
"A Jew, my brother, in the Soviet army as a tank driver. He drove the entire way to Berlin. He is a celebrated hero. Today he lives in Yekaterinburg". Eta Tuchman, Montevideo

421
Herman Rosenberg in the Austrian army, World War I.

422
Michal Szwejlich, First Polish Army. Actor in the Jewish Theater in Warsaw. He passed away in 28 December of 1995.

423
Jehuda Prywes at the time of his army service. 1930s.

424
Mendel Kleinman in the Austrian army. He was killed at the Russian front in the First World War. His son Jzef Kraus (in the picture below) was born after his death.

425
Jzef Kraus (now Jzef Seweryn) in the Third Riflemen's Regiment of Podhale, just after taking the oath, after which he received the Eagle's Quill. 1938s.

426
From the archive of the family of Jzef Leider. Jaroslaw, before World War I.

427 Johan Kapelusz in Irkutsk, imprisoned by the Russians, 1919. "He lived in Brody, he was a painter. When the Russians came, he worked in road construction in order to avoid being deported to Siberia for his bourgeois background. When the German came he went into hidingin various attics. Miraculously, he managed to sneak out when he was betrayed by the son of the building superintendent, himself a Jew. Exhausted, in the fall of 1942 he turned himself over to a transport to the death camp. Around that time his younger brother Albert, who had been in hiding in the marshes outside town, was killed." His daughter

428
Dr. Laszky. Austrian army, World War I.

429 "All that is left from my grandfather is a scorched certificate from the Jewish civil records office stating that Salomon Mejlech Gruber born in Strusw, is a merchant in Zloczw, this photo in an Austrian uniform, and a letter to his son Izaak, my father, who was a Red Army recruit in Voronezh. That letter, dated June 22,1941, was the last word we had of grandfather."

Elzbieta Gruber, Warsaw

 
 
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